Someone Named Eva

-Joan M. Wolf-

Milada, along with another blond-haired blue-eyed Czech girl, is taken from her home to a special camp. It isn’t a concentration camp; instead, it is a centre to teach girls to be “proper” German girls. Milada is given a new name: Eva. The more time she spends at the Lebensborn Centre, the less she remembers who she is. Milada’s Babichka, her grandmother, tells her the night she is taken away,  “Remember, Milada. Remember who you are. Always.” But Milada can’t. It’s so hard to remember anything that isn’t about being a “proper Aryan.”

I love this book. It gives a perspective on the Second World War that we don’t hear about often. I also really like how you can see Milada, and all the rest of the girls, changing; how some of them try holding onto their past and others embrace their new future. Someone Named Eva is definitely my favourite book about World War II.

Lidice, Czechoslovakia – World War II

In 1942, Lidice ceased to exist. Lidice was 20 kilometer west of Prague. It was a small village, nothing out of the ordinary, when the SS (Schutzstaffel, the German government) decided it had to be destlidice_massacred_menroyed. The reason behind the decision of the destruction of Lidice is still unclear, but many theories have been formed. On June 10, 1942, Lidice was targeted. All the men over 15 were shot by firing squad, ten at a time. The women were transported to concentration camp, and the children were bussed to Lovosice which was
located in the area of the former textile factory in Gneisenaustreet of Lodz. But, there were a few “lucky” children such as Milada, who were chosen for Aryanization. Out of the 105 children who were not chosen for Aryanization, only 17 ever returned home. When all the residents were either gone or dead, Lidice was set on fire, then anything that didn’t burn was bulldozed or blown up. Now there is a memochildren-s-memorialrial at the former site of Lidice.

More information on the massacre at Lidice:  

http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/nazioccupation/lidice.html

http://www.outsideprague.com/lidice/lidice.html

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