The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

-C.S. Lewis-

Four siblings, Peter, Susan, Edmund, and Lucy, are sent away from their England home because of the Second World War bombings. They are sent to Professor Kirke’s house (those of you who have read The Magician’s Nephew may recognize the name). While exploring the house, the children find a new world, Narnia, inside of a wardrobe. Narnia is stuck in a hundred year winter, and apparently the four children are prophesied to save it from the White Witch. But one of them may already be in league with the Witch. With Aslan’s help, can they save Narnia?

I love this classic. The Chronicles of Narnia is my all-time favourite series. The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe is the first of the series that C.S. Lewis wrote, but chronologically it comes second in the series. It doesn’t really matter which one you read first; they make sense either way. I love all the magical creatures, like fauns, minotaurs, dryads, and my favourite: the centaurs. This book shows that you should always believe and what the true meaning of sacrifice is. It is a really good analogy of Jesus Christ’s death and resurrection too.

There is a BCC mini TV series and a movie that was co-produced by Walden Media and Walt Disney Pictures of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. While they are both good movies, I personally like the book better, but then, I usually like books better than movies.

Fauns

A faun is a creature who has a human torso and head, and has goat legs andf20fdb661263b17ed7d6319e08025bdf hooves. It also has horns on either side of its head. Mr. Tumnus is the first faun we meet in Narnia. The book describes Mr. Tumnus as just a little taller than Lucy, who is eight at the time. While Tumnus first works for the White Witch, most of the fauns are on the good side. In Roman mythology, fauns are place-spirits of the woodland. Fauns also love to dance and play the flute or other similar instruments. Lewis uses this in the first meeting of Lucy and Tumnus, where Tumnus lulls Lucy to sleep with his flute.

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